• I established right away that we would never define ourselves by the result.
  • I wanted to implement everything way too quickly.
  • I went from making suggestions to making decisions.
  • I realized if we guarded we had a chance.
  • I made sure practice was intense and fun.
  • So much of what we did was a response to things I didn’t like about other places we had been.
  • The safety net of “Let me talk to coach” was no longer there.
  • I tried to shield my players from all of the things that would make them say, “This sucks.”
  • I had to be okay with losing a talented player for the sake of our culture.
  • I went recruiting less than you think.
  • I recruited the most talented kids we could get. It always started with natural talent.
  • I realized I was delivering a message to my players at all times – body language, tone, the way I dressed, my mood – I was never “off.”
  • 75% of what I talked to my team about wasn’t about basketball – it was about mentality, approach and mindset.
  • I asked our players if they thought we could win the league. When they said yes, I asked them how.
  • I should have asked my players more questions.
  • I tried to make sure they saw me laugh at least once every practice.
  • I learned what I said off the court had more impact on their buy-in than what I said on it.
  • I knew that hiring a great staff was crucial.
  • The culture changed, just because I was different. What it became depended on how much time I put into it.
  • I’m so glad I had a defined defensive system to put in from day one.
  • I went home every night for a year wondering if the players really believed in me.
  • I made sure I held everyone in the program – most importantly myself – to the same standard.
  • I encouraged my assistants to coach, to speak up, and to disagree.
  • I promised I would never, ever blame the players.
  • I was glad I kept two files as an assistant coach – one with basketball X+O stuff, and one with philosophy and leadership stuff. I went to them a lot.
  • If the players didn’t know the plays, it was my fault, not theirs.
  • I worked hard to find great managers.
  • I valued walk-ons a great deal.
  • I spent less time recruiting than you would think.
  • I never said one thing and did another.
  • I let practice define us.
  • I made our program transparent – to students, to alums, to media. Practices were always open.
  • I should have spent more one on one time with my players.
  • I gave them the offensive end, as long as they gave me the defensive end.
  • I never referred to last year.
  • I made sure I never took myself too seriously.

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