• Coaching at the Division I level isn’t different – it’s the attention that surrounds the program that is different.
  • The biggest difference for me was I no longer had to referee intramural football on Tuesdays.
  • When the whistle blows and your team surrounds you at practice, it’s the same – they want to know if you can make them better.
  • It’s a different kind of cold. Trust me.
  • There is an incredible sense of pride at the University of Maine that is special.
  • You can build the right culture independent of results.
  • But everything easier when you have winning behind you.
  • If the kids aren’t treated properly as athletes, they know it. And that is hard to overcome.
  • The Alfond on a Friday night is as electric as it gets.
  • Kids are less concerned with bells and whistles than you think.
  • Good players gravitate towards competence.
  • Don’t be afraid to show your kids that you are vulnerable – it will create a safe environment around your program where they can give you everything they have.
  • You can still establish a positive environment even when you aren’t winning many games.
  • Talent matters – the easier it is for them to do it, the more willing they are to buy into it.
  • Always do the right thing by your players, regardless of the impact it may have on your future. Those relationships are your credibility as a coach.
  • It’s always 72 and sunny in the gym.
  • There is something about a more-with-less culture that is special.
  • When players get in the gym, they really want to know one thing – are you making them better? If you are, you’ve got em.
  • A great staff makes a huge difference.
  • Make sure your Ops guy puts the captions on when playing a movie on the bus so you don’t have to turn the volume up too high. When everyone falls asleep, you won’t wake up in a daze feeling like William Wallace is actually coming after you.
  • Great camaraderie amongst the athletes in different sports has a positive impact on all the programs.
  • The Kennebunk rest stop is a lonely place after 2 in the morning.
  • Winter is 5 months. Spring is 2 weeks.
  • The offense that looked so crisp in your gym in October looks a little different at Hinkle Field House in November.
  • You can stop halfway to have a practice. You can leave a day early. You can spend the night after the game. Bottom line is you just ain’t moving Orono closer to the rest of the U.S.
  • It’s hard for kids to maintain a positive attitude when they aren’t winning, but if the environment is right and they are appreciate how they are being coached, they can do it.
  • Calixte, Little, Myers, Vann, Fleming, Eke, Eze, Stojijlkovic, White… I would have liked to run that team out there for a couple of years in the America East.
  • The America East has some great coaches.
  • Texas Tech will pay you $115,000 to go play them if you have the right date.
  • But it will cost you $35,000 to get your team from Orono to Lubbock.
  • Your record should never define you – not when you are winning, not when you are losing.
  • There is a love affair with women’s basketball in Maine you won’t find in too many places. It’s very cool.
  • Spend a week in Maine and you’ll meet some of the nicest, most genuine people you’ll find anywhere.
  • A results-based approach will wear thin quickly.
  • On average, there’s about one Division I basketball player per year in the state of Maine – and they usually end up being better than you think (Fleming, Mayo, Caner-Medley, Mims, Barr, Mastropolo, Knight…).
  • Count on 10 hours on a bus to get from Binghamton to Orono in the winter.
  • 100% focus on the process is a tremendous challenge.
  • The negative stuff most people talk about – location, cold, long bus rides – really doesn’t have much of an impact if the environment in the gym every day is positive and the players know you are making them better.
  • Maine has a tremendous history of high school basketball. The state tournament is special.
  • Empathy is a great quality to have as a coach.
  • If you are honest with your kids they’ll give you everything they’ve got, and appreciate you forever.
  • If you find yourself in a low-expectations environment, fight it every day.
  • You can recruit good players anywhere. The right culture can overcome a lot of perceived shortcomings.

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *